Manchester City Football Club launches full redress scheme

Manchester City Football Club has announced the launch of a ‘survivor’s scheme’ to compensate victims of non-recent abuse.  The scheme, which will incorporate both compensation and a formal apology, is the first of its kind to be set up by one of the football clubs implicated in football’s sex abuse scandal.

The scheme is for survivors of abuse by Barry Bennell, the former youth coach, who is currently serving a 30 year prison sentence, and with a further criminal trial potentially still to follow.  The scheme also incorporates the victims of John Broome, a former talent spotter and coach connected with Manchester City, against whom allegations of assault have also been made.  Broome died in 2010.

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Australia – The ongoing cost of Redress

On the 5 March 2019 the Australian Government reported that, to date, it has committed AUS$52.1 million to support Australians engaging with the National Redress Scheme for survivors of institutional child sexual abuse, through Redress Support Services.

It also announced five additional grants that are being offered to establish Redress Support Services in areas of specific need.

The new additional Redress Support Service providers being offered a grant to establish Redress Support Services in areas of specific need are:

  • ACT Disability and Carer Advocacy Service
  • Cape York Remote Area Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Child Care Advisory Association
  • Pilbara Community Legal Service
  • Survivors and Mates Support Network (SAMSN)
  • Blue Knot Foundation.

The services include remote and regional areas, services that support male survivors of institutional child sexual abuse, survivors with disability and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander.

As a result, 39 Redress Support Services will be funded until June 2021.

The objective is that these Redress Support Services will offer survivors of institutional child sexual abuse an independent, trusted source of information and much needed support as they engage with the National Redress Scheme.

With the National Redress Scheme in Australia due to run until the 30 June 2028 one suspects this is only the start of the state funding that will be needed to support the estimated 60,000 to 65,000 applicants for redress.


moohan_sharonv2 Authored by Sharon Moohan, partner

IICSA – redress related themes emerging from initial reports

Three reports have been published this year, the first two relate to investigations and the third is the over-arching interim report. Previous blogs have commented on these individually but it is clear that some patterns and key issues are emerging. Some of those relate to safeguarding and individual institutional responses. Others relate to issues associated with redress. These latter issues are considered below. Continue reading

HIAI report anniversary

Saturday 20th January marks the first anniversary of the publication of the Historical Institutional Abuse Inquiry Report.  The report was published having been delivered to The Executive Office (formerly The Office of the First and Deputy First Ministers) as it was required to do. Continue reading

Accountability & Reparations Investigation

Removal of limitation, changes to Criminal Injuries Compensation and a redress scheme for all abuse victims and survivors were called for by some representatives of victim and survivor core participants at the preliminary hearing of this investigation today.

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Findings & recommendations from the HIA report

The report of the Historical Institutional Abuse Inquiry in Northern Ireland launched today. A copy of the report was delivered to the Executive Office (formerly the Office of First and Deputy First Minister).  The report, which is available online, consists of 10 volumes amounting to 2300 pages.

It deals with issues such as an apology; by whom should an apology be made and the nature of that apology. It also addresses a memorial or tribute to those who suffered abuse, a redress scheme, findings of failings against the State and voluntary providers of residential care homes.

The initial points of interest are the recommendation for a Redress Scheme and criticisms of the involvement of the State in the supervision and inspection of various homes.

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Can a cost be put on redress?

The task of trying to put a value on a potential redress scheme is daunting, but is one which is being tackled in Northern Ireland and is likely to be considered in Scotland and England and Wales.

On Monday 17 October representatives of victims and survivors groups in Northern Ireland presented a paper entitled “A Cost Analysis of A Proposed Redress Scheme for Historical Institutional Abuse” in the Long Gallery at Stormont. In the room were survivors and victims, MLAs and members of the media.

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